I have to work with you on this assignment. The topic chosen would be used throughout the assignment. Please you can decide on the topic that's not too complicated. Attached is the similar topic I came out with.

Select a system topic you are going to use throughout this course. In a paper, analyze your chosen system with the help of the systems theory in the following ways:
•Why is your topic considered a system? Analyze the system’s components.
•How did the system develop?
•Analyze problems historically found with this type of system.
•Determine foreseeable problems with the system as it develops or matures.
•Can it be improved?

For example, using the Titanic as a system topic, state the subsystems, then you might ask yourself what was wrong with the design and construction system for the ship. Is designing a ship around the myth of it being unsinkable the beginning of a systems’ problem? If you were building this ship today, how would you have changed the design system to ask the right design questions and help to mitigate the sinking of the ship?

Support your paper with a minimum of five (5) scholarly resources. In addition to these specified resources, other appropriate scholarly resources, including older articles, may be included.

Length: 5-7 pages not including title and reference pages

Your paper should demonstrate thoughtful consideration of the ideas and concepts that are presented in the course and provide new thoughts and insights relating directly to this topic. Your response should reflect scholarly writing and current APA standards. Be sure to adhere to Northcentral University's Academic Integrity Policy.

The credit card processing system is confusing. The players are numerous and the process is complex. To understand how it all works, it helps to grasp the types of companies that are involved, and how much money they typically charge for processing a transaction.
David Schwartz is director of marketing at a leading payment gateway, Authorize.Net. He says, “This is by far the most complex industry I have ever been associated with. I always tell new employees to give themselves six to nine months to become comfortable with the lingo and to understand how the payment processing system works.” Diagrams of the process can also help. Schwartz continues, “We added a detailed ‘how it works’ diagram to our new corporate website in March 2005. It has since become one of the most visited pages, proving that people want to better understand how a payment is processed.”
To understand the payment process, Schwartz suggests a working knowledge of the participants and the services they provide along the way. He also suggests tracking a hypothetical transaction through the entire payment processing system. In that way, Schwartz says, ecommerce operators can understand not only what services these participating firms provide, but also what fees they charge for processing a transaction.
The Participants
For a typical ecommerce credit card transaction, a number of participants play key roles in the process. Those players include: 
•	the customer,
•	the merchant,
•	the payment gateway,
•	the acquiring bank’s processor,
•	the credit card interchange,
•	the customer’s credit card issuer, and
•	the merchant’s acquiring bank.
Seven participants, in other words, normally interact with each credit card transaction. Notes Schwartz, “With all of these companies involved in the process, it takes, amazingly, just 2- 3 seconds on average for a transaction to be approved.”
Follow the Money
Let’s say you are a $100 credit card purchase. The moment the customer hits the buy button on the ecommerce merchant’s website, you are zooming across cyberspace on a multi-stop journey, during which you will shed, typically, nearly three dollars as companies that you interact with assess varying fees for their service. (Actual fees vary based upon a number of variables, including merchant type, card type and risk factors.)
Your first destination is the payment gateway (-.10¢), which routes you to the appropriate processor (-.08¢). The processor immediately submits you to what is known as the credit card interchange (-.09¢). After you’ve cleared the interchange, your next leg takes you to the issuing bank (-1.93¢), which verifies the available funds in the customer’s credit card account. Whether you are approved or declined, you now begin the journey back to the customer. However, if you’re approved, you and your authorization results are soon to part after speeding by each stop you made on the way. Your detour is through your merchant account at the acquiring bank (-.65¢) to, ultimately, the merchant’s bank account, where you will be deposited; that is, the $97.15 of you that remains.
A credit card merchant account opens new payment opportunities for your business . The U.S. Census Bureau estimates that an approximate 181 million people carry credit cards as of 2010, so accepting them could bring in additional sales revenue. If you plan to get a credit card merchant account, you should learn how a credit card processes when you accept one from a customer.

Read more : http://www.ehow.com/info_7956117_credit-card-process.html
Credit Card Merchant Account
•	A business owner  must have a credit card merchant account to accept credit cards. The process of applying for a merchant account is similar to applying for a business credit card. The account provider asks for the business owner’s tax identification number to check his credit as well as information about the business. To maintain a merchant account, the business owner must pay transaction fees associated with each sale.
Merchant Services Provider
•	The merchant services provider is either a standard bank or a third-party company that has contracted with one of the credit card networks (such as Visa, MasterCard and Discover) to offer services to merchants. When the merchant swipes the customer’s card, the information — including card number, expiration date, CVV (card verification code) and name — goes to the merchant service provider’s system for evaluation.


Read more : http://www.ehow.com/info_7956117_credit-card-process.html
1.	Credit Card Merchant Account
o	A business owner  must have a credit card merchant account to accept credit cards. The process of applying for a merchant account is similar to applying for a business credit card. The account provider asks for the business owner’s tax identification number to check his credit as well as information about the business. To maintain a merchant account, the business owner must pay transaction fees associated with each sale.
Merchant Services Provider
o	The merchant services provider is either a standard bank or a third-party company that has contracted with one of the credit card networks (such as Visa, MasterCard and Discover) to offer services to merchants. When the merchant swipes the customer’s card, the information — including card number, expiration date, CVV (card verification code) and name — goes to the merchant service provider’s system for evaluation.
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Credit Card Network
o	After the credit card provider receives information about the electronic transaction, it sends the information to the credit card network. The credit card company then checks the customer’s account to see if funds are available before reporting this information to the merchant with an approval. The merchant can then feel comfortable providing his products or services to the customer and the terminal produces a receipt. The process takes a matter of seconds.
Batch Processing
o	After the approval, the merchant submits all charges for the day to the card network through the merchant services provider for what is called batch processing. The provider communicates with the customer’s bank to debit the customer’s account to retrieve the funds. Days later, the merchant receives a deposit  for the sale to his bank account from the merchant services account provider.


Read more : http://www.ehow.com/info_7956117_credit-card-process.html
How Credit Card Processing Works
The credit card transaction can seem like a confusing process, especially when you take into account all of the participants that play key roles in transmitting and authorizing funds. Yet understanding how credit card processing works can provide better insight as to what goes on behind the scenes once the credit card is swiped, and the purpose of each participant throughout the process. In the few seconds it takes for a transaction to go through, whether during a face-to-face or online sale, the credit card payment makes quite the journey.
1.	The process starts with the customer and the merchant. 
2.	The customer makes a credit card payment, which is sent to the payment gateway or terminal via the Internet or a phone line. 
3.	The payment gateway/terminal routes the payment to the merchant bank’s processor. 
4.	The processor submits the payment to the credit card network, and once cleared, the payment makes its way to the customer’s credit card issuing bank. 
5.	The authorization request to the issuing bank includes the credit card number, the card’s expiration date, the billing address for AVS (Address Verification System) validation, the CVV number and the payment amount.
6.	The issuing bank validates the card number, checks the amount of funds available, checks to make sure the billing address provided matches the one on file, and validates the CVV number. Depending on available funds in the customer’s account and whether the billing address and CVV are correct, the payment is either approved or declined. 
7.	If approved, the authorization goes back through the credit card network, the processor and the payment gateway to the merchant and the customer. 
8.	The payment continues to the merchant’s bank account, completing the transaction.   
What Makes BluePay Different?
The credit card transaction process is the same for all acquirers. What makes BluePay different is our technology and our ability to consolidate vendors. In the steps above, BluePay is the payment gateway and the processor. That means instead of using a third-party gateway to route the payments, we can provide our own fast, secure payment gateway in addition to our wide range of credit card processing products. Rather than have to contact a different company with gateway questions or concerns, our merchants have just one company to call and one billing statement to receive.
How to Evaluate Credit Card Processing Companies for Small Businesses
Posted on February 27, 2013 | 1:49 PM
How do you know which credit card processing company is best for your business?
For small businesses, this is an important decision that can have a substantial effect on your success. When choosing the most suitable merchant services company, you should consider the following:
Learn what processors offer - Small businesses need to learn what the credit card processing companies have to offer to see if they can fit their needs. Be aware of the major credit cards, debit card networks and various payments that are accepted. What types of payment does the service support and what other services are offered such as check processing or prepaid card services?
In addition to the payment options, make sure you select a merchant services provider that offers adequate support. It is important to select a processor that offers 24/7 customer service and technical support. Other things to look for are live chat support and support by email if you prefer those methods of communication. You also want to choose a company that will support you if you have a chargeback or fraud issue.
Determine the total costs - Costs vary by different processors, so small businesses should be aware of the various charges for payment processing solutions. Consider application fees, monthly minimums, monthly statement fees and any other additional fees. How much do they charge per month/ per transaction? What is the transaction fee?
Also be aware of the initial cost of equipment and the set-up fee. Some processors may charge less for equipment, but increase set up fees. One processor may charge hundreds of dollars more than another company for an identical piece of equipment. Don’t just pick the least expensive one. Find out the prices and compare it to the other companies out there so you can be sure to get the best value.
 For instance, if you are already accepting credit cards, First Merchant Services will match or beat your existing processing rates. If this is your first time processing credit cards, you can rest assured you will receive the best processing rates available along with a free POS system. We also offer free processing equipment including credit card terminals, cash registers and touch-screen POS systems.
Read the fine print - Make sure you carefully read the contracts and application forms presented to you. Certain details may be left out when evaluating a processor, but can show up in the contract. Some processors may hide their fees or fail to mention them. Be aware of termination and cancellation conditions, including any penalties that may occur. This will help you avoid problems or unresolved questions, as well as prevent any surprises.
By completing these actions, you will effectively be able to evaluate credit card processors and determine the appropriate service for your company.
- See more at: http://firstmerchantservices.com/blog/2013/02/how-to-evaluate-credit-card-processing-companies-for-small-businesses/#sthash.TBI1pANs.dpuf