PHL- Philosophy
Directions: This exam covers the following material: books I and II in Aristotle’s Ethics, Kant and the first three chapters of Mill, plus the Ken Miller talk. Read all directions carefully. Please type all answers, except for any necessary drawings or diagrams, e.g., of Aristotle’s virtues. You may leave some white space there and hand draw them. You are to download this exam, neatly type all your answers, and bring the hardcopy to class, stapled. Please keep the questions in the exam, along with your answers (i.e., do not delete the questions please). Please boldface all of your answers; it makes your exam easier to read and grade. Thanks, and may your answers be neither deficient nor excessive. I. Read each question carefully. Place a T for true or an F for false to the left of each question. Please boldface your answers. (15) 1. For Aristotle, anger is a virtue. 2. At the beginning of book I, Aristotle thinks that most of our activities aim at some good. 3. Aristotle likens virtue to a kind of excellence. 4. For Aristotle, the main purpose of politics is to create the best policies. 5. In book II, Aristotle asserts that human beings are evil by nature. 6. Aristotle thinks virtue is the sufficient condition for happiness. 6. Kant believes there are two sets of laws—moral and natural. 7. Mill believes that what sanctions or justifies his greatest happiness principle, as the central principle of ethics, is reason. 8. Virtue is only conditionally good according to Kant. 9. Kant thinks the empirical component to morality is an important, though the least important, component to morality. 10. Kant thinks one can be virtuous and evil. 11. For Kant, being subject to the moral law is like being subject to a monarch. 12. Kant believes that, in all instances, one should not lie, with no exceptions. 13. Kant believes one should fully desire the good in order to be genuinely motivated to do the good. 14. Kant gives us...