I have only 1 hour to submit it.
please in this paper is missing the conclusion, Based on the paper and the analysis for the restaurant , you have to fill the empty cells and then you have to make a conclusions. (1 page for the conclusions) 








                                                                      
Madelin Boudet
Final Project
MBA
Florida National University














Abstract 


This project will develop an exhaustive analysis based in the Baldrige Criteria for Performance Excellence for Jolly Hamburger Restaurant, deepening in key areas of the business: leadership; strategic planning; customer and market focus; measurement, analysis and knowledge management; human resources focus; process management; and business/organizational performance results. This paper apply all procedures learned in dynamic analysis of organizations.
















Introduction
	In line with its commitment to delivering high quality food and service to the customers, Jolly Hamburger Restaurant is exerting efforts to operate in accordance to the Baldrige Criteria for Performance Excellence. This paper summarizes the assessment undertaken by the restaurant using the Baldrige Criteria for Performance Excellence framework, which looks at seven key areas of the business: leadership; strategic planning; customer and market focus; measurement, analysis and knowledge management; human resources focus; process management; and business/organizational performance results. To proceed with the assessment, the seven-step for full examination has been used. The primary purpose of the assessment is to evaluate the company and make suggestions in a way that will improve the organizational management. 

Step 1: Are We Making Progress? Are We Making Progress as Leaders? Assessments
	As part of the assessment, employees and leaders/managers of the restaurant were asked to respond to two questionnaires (i.e., Are We Making Progress? for the restaurant staffs and the Are We Making Progress as Leaders? For the restaurant owner and supervisor) which both seek to determine key strengths and most importantly the areas for improvement. 
Are We Making Progress?
Beginning with the first questionnaire (see Appendix 1), respondents, mainly employees of the restaurant were asked to respond to a total of 40 statements that were grouped into seven categories: (1) leadership (2) strategic planning (3) customer focus (4) measurement, analysis and knowledge management (5) workforce focus (6) operations focus, and (7) results. Analysis and interpretation of the responses provided by the restaurant staffs are summarized as follows:
•	In the area of leadership, the restaurant seemed to be doing well, as most of the respondents responded favorably. For example, almost all agree that they are aware of the company’s mission and vision and that the senior leaders in the company use the organization’s values to guide the members; create a work environment that help members do their job; share information about the organization; and solicit the members’ suggestions and feedbacks. 
•	In the area of strategic planning, the responses of the respondents suggest that the restaurant needs improvement in this area. For example, the restaurant gives little regard to innovation and does not encourage totally new ideas. In addition, the restaurant fails to provide members with information on how the organization’s plans will affect their work and on whether they are making progress. Furthermore, though the restaurant aims to adapt to changes quickly, certain factors make it difficult to readily adjust to changes. 
•	With regards to the area of customer focus, the restaurant tends to excel in this area. The responses of the respondents indicate that they are very much aware of who their customers are as well as who are the most important customers of the restaurant. In addition, the respondents noted that they go out their way to ask the customers what they need and want and whether they are satisfied or dissatisfied with the products and service. 
•	The area measurement, analysis and knowledge management may be considered one of the areas that require improvement. Base on the responses of the employees and staffs of the restaurant, they are not aware of how to measure the quality of their work and therefore do not use this information to make changes to improve their work. In addition, the respondents revealed that they do not know how the measures used in their work match the organization’s overall measures of improvement. Lastly, they lack information on how well the organization as a whole is performing.       
•	In the area of workforce focus, the responses of the members indicate that the restaurant is performing relatively well in this area. The respondents believe that the people are cooperative and work as a team. In the addition, the respondents noted that the superiors encourage them to develop their skills and advance their careers. Furthermore, the respondents believe that they receive recognition for their work, work in a safe environment, and the organization values them. In this regard, they are highly committed to contribute to their organization’s success.  
•	In the area of operations focus, the restaurant seemed to perform well in some areas and perform poorly in others. For example, the respondents believe that they have good processes to accomplish their work and have everything to do their jobs. However, they also believe that they do not have full control over work processes are not prepared to handle emergencies. 
•	Finally, in the area of results, the restaurant tends to be strong in some areas and weak in others. Base on the responses of the members, the customers are satisfied with work; they know that the organization is doing well financially; the organization has the right people and skills to do work; the organization obeys laws and regulations; and the organization is a good place to work. However, responses also indicate that the restaurant fails to remove things that get in the way of progress; does not help members to help the community; and does not practice high standards and ethics.


Are We Making Progress as Leaders?
Similar with the “Are We Making Progress?” the “Are We Making Progress as Leaders?” questionnaire (see Appendix 2) also has 40 questions that are also grouped into seven categories. Unlike in the first questionnaire in which the respondents were mainly staffs and employees of the restaurant, the respondents in the second questionnaire were the restaurant owner and the supervisor. Analysis and interpretation of the responses are given as follows:
•	In the area of leadership, the responses of the restaurant owner and supervisor confirmed the responses given by the restaurant staffs. For example, they believe that the employees know the organization’s mission. In addition, they noted that the leadership team: uses the organization’s values to guide the members of the organization; creates a work environment that helps employees do their job; shares information about the organization; encourages learning that can help employees advance in their careers; lets employees know their expectations; and asks employees what they think. 
•	In the area of strategic planning, the responses of the restaurant owner and supervisor also suggest that the restaurant needs improvement in this area. Looking at the responses, the leadership team does not ask the employees for ideas when planning for the future.  In addition, the leadership team fails to provide information to employees on how the organization’s plans will affect them and their work. In addition, the leadership team fails to inform employees about how they are making progress on their work. 
•	In the area of customer and market focus, the responses of the restaurant owner and supervisor confirmed that the restaurant excels in this area.  Base on the responses, the employees are well aware of who their most important customers are. Furthermore the employees always keep in touch with the customers and always ask the customers if they are satisfied or dissatisfied with their work. In addition, the employees are allowed to make decisions to solve problems for their customers.
•	In the area of measurement, analysis and knowledge management, the responses of the restaurant owner and supervisor imply that this is an area of concern. Their responses show that: the employees: do not know how to measure the quality of their work; do not know how to analyze the quality of their work to see if changes are needed; do not use these analyses to make decisions about their work; do not know how the measures they use in their work fit into the organization’s overall measure of improvement; do not get all the information they need to do their work; and do not get the information they need to know how the organization is doing.
•	In the area of human resource focus, the restaurant owner and supervisor both agree on the following: the employees can make changes that will improve their work; the employees cooperate and work as a team; the employees are recognized for their work; and the employees have a safe workplace.  Furthermore, they both agreed that they encourage and enable the employees to develop their job skills in a manner that will advance their careers and that they care about the employees.
•	In the area of process management, the respondents believed that the organization has good processes for doing work, but also felt that employees cannot get everything they need to do their jobs and do not have control over their personal work processes. In addition, they believed that employees do not collect information about the quality of their work. 
•	In the area of business results, responses of the restaurant owner and supervisor showed that the organization obeys laws and regulations and has high standards of ethics. Furthermore, they also noted that the customers are satisfied with the work of the employees and the employees’ work products meet all requirements. However, they also feel that the employees are not using their time and talents well. In addition, they feel that the organization does not help employees to help their community. 

Step 2: Easy Insight 
	The primary purpose of this part of the assessment is not to answer the questions but to determine whether the leadership team could respond to these and therefore advance to the next step in the process which is the development of the organizational profile. Consequently, the result of the assessment indicated that it is now possible to advance to the next step.

Step 3: Organizational Profile
	In this part of the assessment, the goal is to develop the organizational profile. This part of the assessment aims to give a snapshot of the organization as well as the key influences on how it operates and the key challenges it faces. To provide an overview, the first part of the assessment is the Organizational Description, which addresses the organization’s operating environment and key relationship with key groups (i.e., customers, suppliers, partners, and stakeholders). The second part is the Organizational Situation, which aims to establish a description of the organization’s competitive environment, key strategic challenges and advantages, and the current system for performance.	
Organizational Description
a.	Organizational Environment
(1)	Product Offerings: The Jolly Hamburger Restaurant offers a wide range of products that matches the taste and preferences of the customers. Aside from the signature burgers offered by the restaurant, it also allows the customers to create their own burger by choosing the dressing and other add-ons. The great tasting food teamed with excellent customer service serve as the pillars of the Jolly Hamburger Restaurant. To do this, the restaurant employs workers that embody the aspirations of the restaurant.
(2)	Vision and Mission: 
Mission Statement: The Jolly Hamburger Restaurant commits itself to delivering exquisite experience to the customers by giving them quality food and service.
Vision Statement: The Jolly Hamburger Restaurant continuously strives to be the customers’ first choice when it comes to dining.
Core Competencies: The core competencies of Jolly Hamburger Restaurant include quality, customer service, and competitive prices.
(3)	Workforce Profile: The Jolly Hamburger Restaurant employs highly competent employees who have undergone rigorous screening to ensure that they have the qualifications and competencies to deliver high quality food and service to the customers.
(4)	Assets: The restaurant employs state-of-the-art facilities to ensure high quality food and productivity.
(5)	Regulatory Requirements: Restaurants need to operate in accordance to Federal and state retail and food service codes and regulations

b.	Organizational Relationships 
(1)	Organizational Structure: The Jolly Hamburger Restaurant under the a top-down organizational structure, in which decision-making is concentrated at the top of the organization
(2)	Customers and Stakeholders: The restaurant mainly caters to students from nearby schools and universities; people who work in the downtown area during the day; surrounding businesses looking for business meetings; and workers with families looking for take-out food to take home for family dinner at the end of the workday.
(3)	Suppliers and Partners: Key suppliers include suppliers of food and kitchen supplies. The suppliers play a key role since they provide the materials used to make and prepare the products offered by the restaurant.
Organizational Situation
a.	Competitive Environment
(1)	Competitive Position: The Jolly Hamburger Restaurant is one of the fast-growing casual dining restaurants. With two branches, it belongs to the small-to-medium enterprises group. In the market where the restaurant operates, major competitors include fast-food restaurants and fine dining restaurants.
(2)	Competitiveness Changes: A major trend in the market is the growing demand for healthier alternatives. This creates opportunities to offer healthier food options and cater to a larger market.
(3)	Comparative Data: Comparative and competitive data about the industry is available online and through special sources such as market researches and industry information offered and sold by market research companies and government agencies.
b.	Strategic Context: In the area of business, key challenge is growing competition in the market and key advantage is excellent customer service and orientation. In the area of operations, key challenge is how to increase efficiency and productivity and key advantage is its state-of-the-art facilities. In terms of social responsibility, major challenge is increasing costs associated to environmental initiatives while key advantage is positive impression among customers and employees. In terms of workforce, the key challenge is increasing labor costs while key advantage is the positive attitude and high motivation of the workers.
c.	Performance Improvement System: At present, the employee appraisal system is the only system in place for evaluating the performance of the employees. As for the performance of the restaurant, the quarterly financial reports provide the means for measuring performance.    

Step 4: Review of Criteria Questions
	The criteria questions in each of the seven categories (i.e., leadership; strategic planning; customer and market focus; measurement, analysis and knowledge management; human resources focus; process management; and business/organizational performance results) have been used as guides in assessing the restaurant. Initial assessment showed that the restaurant is deficient in the following areas: strategic planning; measurement, analysis and knowledge management; and business results. 

Step 5: Review of Scoring Guidelines
	Review of the scoring guidelines revealed that the restaurant have scores of 65% and lower in all the seven areas. The scores suggest that the Jolly Hamburger Restaurant needs to undergo significant changes and improvement to meet the Baldrige Criteria for Performance Excellence.

Step 6: Self-Assessment 	
	The assessment indicated that one of the major areas of concern for the restaurant is the area of measurement, analysis and knowledge management. This area is primarily concerned with how the organization selects, gathers, analyzes, manages, and improves its data, information, and knowledge assets. Furthermore, this area is concerned with how the organization learns and how it manages information technology. Lastly, this area is concerned with how the organization uses review findings to improve its performance. An overview of the assessment in this area is shown as follows:
Measurement, Analysis and Knowledge Management  
a.	Competitive Environment
(1)	Performance Measures: the restaurant does not have a standard system for selecting, collecting, aligning, and integrating data and information. Daily sales record is the only indicator or measure of daily performance.
(2)	Comparative Data: the restaurant does not use comparative data in making operational and strategic decisions.
(3)	Customer Data: the restaurant conducted consumer satisfaction surveys in the past and used the information to make improvements inside the restaurant. Furthermore, the restaurant is in the process of building a customer database as part of the goal of launching a customer loyalty program.  
(4)	Measurement Agility: the restaurant gives little regard to measuring performance and therefore did not exert efforts to ensure that the performance management system can respond to rapid or unexpected organizational or external changes.
b.	Performance Analysis and Review: at present, the only measure of performance is the sales record. The restaurant uses the sales record to determine the performance and growth of the business. 
c.	Performance Improvement
(1)	Best Practices: sales performance is the main indicator of the performance of each product line. Base on sales, salads and burgers are best performing product lines. However, the restaurant did not exert effort to determine the best practices in these product lines.
(2)	Future Performance: it is not part of the practice at the restaurant to use performance review findings as well as key comparative and competitive data in projecting future performance.
(3)	Continuous Improvement and Innovation: the restaurant has not made it a practice to use performance review findings to develop priorities for continuous improvement.

Step 7: Final Assessment and Action Plans
	Overall, the leadership team at the Jolly Hamburger Restaurant believes that the restaurant performed well in some categories and performed poorly in other categories. Among the areas in which the restaurant performed poorly is in the area of measurement, analysis and knowledge management.  To improve in this area, the leadership team at the restaurant has developed an action plan which involves the following key initiatives: first, identify key performance indicators; second, devise a system for measuring and tracking the identified key performance indicators; third, train the employees and staffs of the restaurant to use the system; fourth, implement the system; fifth, use the data and information as basis for strategic planning.
Strategic Plans: Introducing Changes and Managing the Change Process
	On a long term outlook, the leadership at the Jolly Hamburger Restaurant also believes that in order to operate in accordance to the Baldrige Criteria for Performance Excellence, it would be vital to introduce radical changes to the organization. The leadership at the restaurant agrees that to keep pace with the changes in the market, the organization needs to change on a continuous basis. Accordingly, organizations remain competitive when they support and implement continuous and transformational change. In this regard, the leadership has decided to introduce changes to the restaurant specifically to its systems, processes, practices, and most especially to its culture. However, the main issue is that undergoing and managing change may be considered as a difficult and complex process. Nevertheless, the leadership is optimistic that by adhering to the change management model of Kotter (2011), the restaurant will be able to get through and overcome the change process successfully. To provide an overview, Kotter’s (2011) change management model is composed of eight steps outlined as follows: (1) establishing a sense of urgency (2) forming a powerful guiding coalition (3) creating a vision (4) communicating the vision (5) empowering others to act on the vision (6) planning for and creating short-term wins (7) consolidating improvements and producing still more changes (8) institutionalizing new approaches. 
(1)	Establishing a Sense of Urgency: In Kotter’s model, this step involves examining the market and competitive realities, and identifying and discussing crises, potential crises, or major opportunities. In line with this, the result of the assessments (i.e., Are We Making Progress? conducted on restaurant staffs and the Are We Making Progress as Leaders? conducted on the restaurant owner and supervisor) will serve as the trigger to motivating the restaurant staffs and employees to realize the need to implement changes. 
(2)	Forming a Powerful Guiding Coalition: Kotter’s model requires the formation of a strong team to lead the change effort. In this regard, the leadership will assemble a cross-functional team to lead and handle the change process. Attention will be given in the selection of the members of the team. 
(3)	 Creating a Vision: This step in the process involves creating a vision to help direct the change effort. In the case of the restaurant, a suitable vision would be to transform the restaurant into a high-quality establishment noted for excellence in food and service and at par with the best in the industry. The team responsible for leading the change effort will be finalizing the vision. 
(4)	 Communicating the Vision: Kotter’s model emphasized the need to use all possible means to communicate the new vision and strategies. As such, the leadership will exert efforts to ensure that every employee and staff of the restaurant will be well informed of the impending changes so that they will be able to understand and comply with the new changes. Meetings and orientations will be scheduled to ensure that everybody in well informed and aware of the impending changes and where the restaurant is headed.
(5)	Empowering Others to Act on the Vision: This step in the process is concerned with eliminating obstacles to change and changing systems or structures that negatively affects the vision. In line with this, the leadership at the restaurant will take the lead role in encouraging all employees and staffs to get involved in the change process and make suggestions for improvement.
(6)	Planning for and Creating Short-Term Wins: This step in the process involves planning for visible performance improvements, creating those improvements, and recognizing and rewarding employees involved in the improvements. For the restaurant, the leadership will make it a point to report the improvements and to give rewards and recognition to worthy employees particularly to those who have been involved and contributed to improvement efforts. Furthermore, the leadership plans on devising an incentive system that will reward employees for sharing improvement ideas and suggestions. 
(7)	Consolidating Improvements and Producing still More Changes: This step in the process is concerned with using increased credibility to change systems, structures, and policies that do not fit the vision; hiring, promoting, and developing employees who can implement the vision; and reinvigorating the process with new projects, themes, and change agents. For the restaurant, the leadership will leverage on the successful change efforts to introduce and motivate more changes. The goal is to encourage the organization to continuously change and to create a culture that openly accepts changes. 
(8)	Institutionalizing New Approaches: This step in the process is concerned with articulating the connections between the new behaviors and corporate success, and developing the means to ensure leadership development and succession. In the case of the restaurant, the focus is in stage is to create shared values and culture that will guide behavior. Shared values and culture that upholds quality and excellence will be the key to transforming the restaurant into a high-quality and high-performing restaurant that strongly meets the Baldrige Criteria for Performance Excellence.       





















Appendix 1: Are We Making Progress?
 
 
 
 
 
 
 








Appendix 2: Are We Making Progress as Leaders?
 
 
 
 
 
 

 










Reference
Kotter, J. (2011). HBR’s 10 must reads: On change management. Boston, Massachusetts: 
Harvard Business Review Press.