preferred learning style

preferred learning style

Each person has a preferred way to learn new information or a preferred learning style. Identifying your strengths and weaknesses with the learning process will help you become a more reflective learner. As a training practitioner, it is valuable to understand the variability in learning styles so that you can design training to meet the needs of all your learners.

If you have not done so already, view the Learning Styles multimedia piece located in this unit's studies. Identify your own learning style based on the descriptions you read.

In your response reflect on your own learning style and describe a scenario in which you had difficult time learning new information because it was presented in a format that was not conducive to your own style. Also, how can training designers use information about learning styles to help them create courses to meet the needs of all the participants? 
Additional Requirements 

Other Requirements: OVERVIEW OF PRIMARY LEARNING STYLES
Learners have natural preferences regarding how they absorb and process information. Some learners prefer to see information, and others prefer to listen to information; some like to focus on the words used, and some like a more active, hands-on approach.

VISUAL LEARNING STYLE
Visual learners prefer to learn by seeing information. Some examples of this include learning through drawings, graphics, charts, and multimedia.

AUDITORY LEARNING STYLE
Auditory learners prefer to learn by listening to information. Some examples of this include learning by listening to presentations, hearing and repeating words.

VERBAL LEARNING STYLE
Verbal learners often think in words and use them effectively. Some examples of the way this group learns best include solving puzzles, logic games, creating poetry or stories, or engaging in a debate.

KINESTHETIC LEARNING STYLE
Kinesthetic learners prefer to learn through physical and hands-on activities. Some examples of this include role-playing, creating things, or demonstrations.

REFERENCES
Gardner, H. (1993). Multiple intelligences: The theory in practice. New York: BasicBooks.
CREDITS
Subject Matter Expert:
Dr. Marni Swain
Interactive Design:
Tara Schiller, Zack Hayden
Instructional Designer:
Rosalie Miller
Project Manager:
Erin Coffey