FAH102 Exhibition Project 2017

FAH102 Exhibition Project 2017

FAH102 Exhibition Project 2017
Worth 40% of your Final Mark
Part 1 due February 28th at 4pm: 10% (individual)
Part 2 due April 4th at 6pm: 30% (15% individual; 15% group)
For this project, you and a small team from your tutorial section will pretend that you are launching an
exhibition with unlimited funds and resources. Your exhibition and the objects you display must be
developed around one of the following six themes:
1. Art, Time, and Tempos
2. Art and the Body
3. Stranger Things (or Spaces)
4. Iconophilia, Iconoclasm, and Iconophobia
5. Truth and Deception
6. Where Art is Made
• Sign up for a group theme on Blackboard by clicking on ‘Tutorial and Group Signup’ in the left
control panel.
• Each tutorial section will be divided into six groups, one for each theme.
• Groups are capped at 4 members – no more! If there is a theme you really want to work on, sign
up
right away before groups fill up.
• These topics have been made broad on purpose, so that you and your group will be able to
approach the theme from different perspectives. In the first part of the project, you will explore
these various perspectives on your own, and in the second part of the project, you and your team
will pick a particular aspect that works for everyone.
Part 1 Initial Ideas (approx. 4 pages); due February 28th by 4pm
You will work on this part of the project as an individual, but you should still exchange ideas within
your
group. For now, you are not being asked to write a formal essay with a thesis statement or argument,
rather you are writing a series of discursive reflections on your theme, allowing for different ideas and
positions. Although there is room for your thoughts to diverge, you should make sure that the ideas
are
organized and communicated in a way that is clear and logical for your reader. Write in full sentences
and paragraphs for all components.
There are 4 components to this stage of the project:
• Theme Reflection (approx. 300 words): Try to think of two or three very distinct ways that you
could define the theme. What kinds of questions does the theme raise? How do you understand
the meaning of each term and how might different kinds of art change its meaning or
significance? Which of the methods that we have covered or that we will cover do you think
might give you the best approach to these questions and why? What kind of information do you
expect to find by taking that approach?
• Theme Research (approx. 300 words): After you have written your reflection, consult the Grove
Dictionary of Art, the Encyclopedia of Aesthetics, and the Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts,
or go further and consult an academic book, or an academic article that addresses the theme or
2
some aspect of your theme. Explain what you have discovered and how your understanding of
the theme has changed or has become clearer?
• Pick and Describe a Related Work of Art: Pick any work of art that you think illustrates the
theme in some way, whether it’s through its materials, its formal qualities (the forms that
construct the work and organize it into parts), its subject matter, its original context, its current
context, its reception (the responses of viewers), etc.
o Provide a thumbnail image of the work, and a caption: the caption should list the
artist/maker (if known), its title, its date, its materials, and its current location.
o Describe and discuss the work (approx. 200 words): Introduce the work by describing
what it is and what it’s about. Then explain why it interests you, why you think it relates
to your theme, and of course, what methods or approaches from the course you think
will help your analysis.
• Annotated Bibliography (3 x 100 words): Compile an annotated bibliography consisting of at
least 3 sources.
o Make sure these sources are academic and not intended for a general audience.
o At least one of these sources should be about the general theme. (Try to go beyond the Grove
Dictionary of Art, the Encyclopedia of Aesthetics, and the Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts – but
you might look in their bibliographies for suggestions).
o For each source, write three or four clear explanatory sentences (roughly 100 words), describing
what the source is about and why it will be useful for your catalogue. You might indicate what
art historical method is most prominent.
o Follow the proper bibliographic format according to the Chicago Manual of Style.
Submission Details for Part 1
• Format: Use double spacing and 12 point Times New Roman font. You do not need a cover
page. On the top of the first page, include your name, student number, tutorial section (e.g.
Tutorial E), and your theme.
• The project must be uploaded to Turnitin by 4pm on February 28th.
◦ Class ID: 14488939
◦ Password: Lermolieff
• You must also bring a paper copy of your project to class.
• To your paper copy, attach the Academic Integrity checklist, which must be signed and filled
out. This form is located in Course Materials in the folder for the Exhibition Project.
Part 2 Virtual Exhibition and Catalogue; due April 4th by 6pm
As a group of 3-4 members, you will need to produce:
• A more specific title for the exhibition and a title page for an exhibition catalogue (work as a
group)
• An introductory essay (work as a group)
• 2 catalogue entries from each member (work as an individual, but share ideas with the group as
you go)
• Wall labels for each work of art or structure (work as an individual)
3
• A layout or floor plan of the exhibition space, indicating where you would locate each of your
various works.
As an Individual (15% of your final grade):
Building on your reflection of a work of art in part 1 of the project, each of you will now
write two
catalogue entries on two works of art or structures, and you will write wall labels for each
work/structure. You can use the same work from part 1, but the second work should be something local
that you can visit in person.
Although as a group you should be making sure that all the catalogue entries have the same appearance
and that they follow the same format, each member is ultimately responsible for the writing and editing
of their own catalogue entries and wall texts, and will receive an individual grade for that work.
• A short block of wall text (approx. 150 words) is a small descriptive panel or label that is usually
situated next to a work of art in a real exhibition. For the wall text, which will accompany each
object in the exhibition, you will write a few sentences that highlight a big idea about the work.
Think of this as your chance to grab the attention of a casual museum-goer who has not read
the catalogue and needs a “hook” to get interested in things. What can you say in this didactic
wall text to draw that viewer into the work and get him/her looking and thinking?
• Each of your 2 catalogue entries (approx. 500 words apiece) will talk about the work in more
detail. Start with a brief denotative description of the work. You might also think about what
aspects your reader should pay particular attention to. Your brief introductory description
should be followed by an explanation of the work’s significance. This is where you will do the
actual methodological analysis of your work. Explain how other scholars have approached the
work or how they have approached works similar to it. Think about how your approach casts a
new light on their interpretations.
◦ The catalogue entry should not repeat the description of the work in the curator’s essay (see
below).
◦ Include an image for each work of art at the beginning of the catalogue entry, along with a
catalogue number.
◦ List relevant technical info: art, title, date, location, medium of the work.
◦ Be sure to add your name at the bottom of each catalogue entry.
◦ Use endnote citations. You should refer to at least 2 different sources (not including
assigned readings from the course) in each entry.
• The sources mentioned in your citations should then be included in a bibliography at
the end of the whole catalogue.
As a Group (15% of your final grade):
Building on your reflections of the theme in part 1, you will now work as a team to bring
everything
together and form a coherent exhibition catalogue on a particular aspect of your theme.
• This is not a project that can be done at the last minute, and it is unfair to your group mates
if
you fall behind when they’re depending on your contributions to continue. Early in the process
you should discuss what roles each member will play in the group (editors, layout designers,
group coordinators), and discuss your schedules in a typical week and over the course of the
term. Using this information, set up mutually convenient meeting times as soon as you can, and
establish several deadlines for different stages of the project!
4
• Decide together on an exhibition title that narrows the scope of your theme, then design a title
page that includes the title and the names of all the members of the group. Make sure your title
works with everyone’s chosen objects.
• Building on your thematic reflections from part 1, work collaboratively to write a curators’ essay
that introduces your theme and explains the title.
o The essay should begin with an introduction to the exhibition that defines what the
theme of your exhibition is and what kinds of objects it includes (paintings, sculptures,
photography, buildings, performances, mixed media objects, etc.). You should also
explain why all these works in your exhibition have been brought together, and what
points you hope to make by having them seen as a group.
o Why is your exhibition important and how have others addressed this general theme?
You will need to do some additional research for this section, referring to at least 4
different sources all together (not including assigned readings for the course).
o To create the remainder of your curators’ essay, everyone will be contributing a short
discussion of their chosen works (at least 100 words for each work). Explain how each
work links to the theme and how it makes a unique contribution to the exhibition itself.
These discussions will thus introduce the kinds of questions that the work poses,
anticipating what method(s) will be used in the catalogue entries as an interpretive lens
through which the viewer/reader can better understand the work.
o You want to conclude your introduction by emphasizing what broad insights and ideas
you hope your viewer/reader will take away after seeing the works and reading the
catalogue.
o Use endnote citations for the essay.
• These sources will then be included in a bibliography at the end of the whole
catalogue.
• Include a bibliography for the whole catalogue, including citations from the curator’s essay and
all the catalogue entries.
• Create a floor plan of the exhibition. Pretend that you can bring anything you want to this
space, including buildings. Think carefully about how visitors will understand the theme based
on the order of the objects and on their movement through the space.
• Integrate all components of the exhibition into a consistent look and format. These components
should include the title page, curator’s essay, catalogue entries, wall labels, exhibition layout,
and bibliography of everyone’s sources.
Submission Details for Part 2
• Designate one member to upload a PDF of the whole catalogue to the Group Page on
Blackboard by 6pm on Tuesday April 4th. Here is a link to a short video tutorial on working in
groups through Blackboard:

405Nhi_-y5qNCjrK71
• Designate a single member of your group to upload a copy of your full catalogue to Turnitin by
6pm on Tuesday, April 4th.
• Bring a single printed copy of the whole catalogue to class on April 4th.
5
• Each member of the group should attach to the paper the Academic Integrity form, which must
be signed and filled out.
• Should you need advice about how to work effectively as a group, don’t hesitate to come and
speak to us. There will also be an option for you to provide a candid assessment of your group
and of your personal contributions. Instructions on how to do this will be made available closer
to the due date of the assignment.
Useful Links
Google docs is a great tool for collaborative writing – it will make sharing your thematic reflections and
working on your intro and conclusion much easier.
Doodle polls (doodle.com) are great for coordinating schedules.
The University of Toronto Writing Centre website (the tabs under the Advice section are particularly
useful for researching, writing, and citing):
http://www.writing.utoronto.ca/advice
The Purdue University OWL (Online Writing Lab) (particularly useful for researching, writing, and
citing):
https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/section/2/
The Chicago Manual of Style Quick Reference Guide
http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html
How your Project will be Assessed
Grading in general will be based on how well you combine the works of art in your exhibition with the
theories and methodologies you choose to apply. Make connections between the works and the overall
exhibition idea, and between the various works themselves.
A = Creative and sophisticated evaluation of the relationships between works of art, of the
exhibition theme, and especially of the theoretical methods. Few if any typos. Careful editing;
thoughtful sentences. Meticulous care with the format of endnotes and the bibliography.
B = Analysis emphasizes either the works of art or the theoretical basis for your exhibition idea but
they are related to each; needs editing but generally ok writing. Some mistakes in the format of
bibliographies.
C = Describes the works of art in the exhibition and/or defines and explains the methodology
chosen, yet evidence of haste or lack of care in the details of the project. Explanations are general
or
are missing important pieces of information.
D = Confusing or lacking an analysis of the relationship between the works of art and/or the
theoretical methods. Writing either shows problems in grammar, organization, or logic, and as a
result, several ideas are unclear.
1
FAH102 Exhibition Project 2017
Worth 40% of your Final Mark
Part 1 due February 28th at 4pm: 10% (individual)
Part 2 due April 4th at 6pm: 30% (15% individual; 15% group)
For this project, you and a small team from your tutorial section will pretend that you are launching an
exhibition with unlimited funds and resources. Your exhibition and the objects you display must be
developed around one of the following six themes:
1. Art, Time, and Tempos
2. Art and the Body
3. Stranger Things (or Spaces)
4. Iconophilia, Iconoclasm, and Iconophobia
5. Truth and Deception
6. Where Art is Made
• Sign up for a group theme on Blackboard by clicking on ‘Tutorial and Group Signup’ in the left
control panel.
• Each tutorial section will be divided into six groups, one for each theme.
• Groups are capped at 4 members – no more! If there is a theme you really want to work on, sign
up
right away before groups fill up.
• These topics have been made broad on purpose, so that you and your group will be able to
approach the theme from different perspectives. In the first part of the project, you will explore
these various perspectives on your own, and in the second part of the project, you and your team
will pick a particular aspect that works for everyone.
Part 1 Initial Ideas (approx. 4 pages); due February 28th by 4pm
You will work on this part of the project as an individual, but you should still exchange ideas within
your
group. For now, you are not being asked to write a formal essay with a thesis statement or argument,
rather you are writing a series of discursive reflections on your theme, allowing for different ideas and
positions. Although there is room for your thoughts to diverge, you should make sure that the ideas
are
organized and communicated in a way that is clear and logical for your reader. Write in full sentences
and paragraphs for all components.
There are 4 components to this stage of the project:
• Theme Reflection (approx. 300 words): Try to think of two or three very distinct ways that you
could define the theme. What kinds of questions does the theme raise? How do you understand
the meaning of each term and how might different kinds of art change its meaning or
significance? Which of the methods that we have covered or that we will cover do you think
might give you the best approach to these questions and why? What kind of information do you
expect to find by taking that approach?
• Theme Research (approx. 300 words): After you have written your reflection, consult the Grove
Dictionary of Art, the Encyclopedia of Aesthetics, and the Grove Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts,
or go further and consult an academic book, or an academic article that addresses the theme or
2
some aspect of your theme. Explain what you have discovered and how your understanding of
the theme has changed or has become clearer?
• Pick and Describe a Related Work of Art: Pick any work of art that you think illustrates the
theme in some way, whether it’s through its materials, its formal qualities (the forms that
construct the work and organize it into parts), its subject matter, its original context, its current
context, its reception (the responses of viewers), etc.
o Provide a thumbnail image of the work, and a caption: the caption should list the
artist/maker (if known), its title, its date, its materials, and its current location.
o Describe and discuss the work (approx. 200 words): Introduce the work by describing
what it is and what it’s about. Then explain why it interests you, why you think it relates
to your theme, and of course, what methods or approaches from the course you think
will help your analysis.
• Annotated Bibliography (3 x 100 words): Compile an annotated bibliography consisting of at
least 3 sources.
o Make sure these sources are academic and not intended for a general audience.
o At least one of these sources should be about the general theme. (Try to go beyond the Grove
Dictionary of Art, the Encyclopedia of Aesthetics, and the Encyclopedia of Decorative Arts – but
you might look in their bibliographies for suggestions).
o For each source, write three or four clear explanatory sentences (roughly 100 words), describing
what the source is about and why it will be useful for your catalogue. You might indicate what
art historical method is most prominent.
o Follow the proper bibliographic format according to the Chicago Manual of Style.
Submission Details for Part 1
• Format: Use double spacing and 12 point Times New Roman font. You do not need a cover
page. On the top of the first page, include your name, student number, tutorial section (e.g.
Tutorial E), and your theme.
• The project must be uploaded to Turnitin by 4pm on February 28th.
◦ Class ID: 14488939
◦ Password: Lermolieff
• You must also bring a paper copy of your project to class.
• To your paper copy, attach the Academic Integrity checklist, which must be signed and filled
out. This form is located in Course Materials in the folder for the Exhibition Project.
Part 2 Virtual Exhibition and Catalogue; due April 4th by 6pm
As a group of 3-4 members, you will need to produce:
• A more specific title for the exhibition and a title page for an exhibition catalogue (work as a
group)
• An introductory essay (work as a group)
• 2 catalogue entries from each member (work as an individual, but share ideas with the group as
you go)
• Wall labels for each work of art or structure (work as an individual)
3
• A layout or floor plan of the exhibition space, indicating where you would locate each of your
various works.
As an Individual (15% of your final grade):
Building on your reflection of a work of art in part 1 of the project, each of you will now
write two
catalogue entries on two works of art or structures, and you will write wall labels for each
work/structure. You can use the same work from part 1, but the second work should be something local
that you can visit in person.
Although as a group you should be making sure that all the catalogue entries have the same appearance
and that they follow the same format, each member is ultimately responsible for the writing and editing
of their own catalogue entries and wall texts, and will receive an individual grade for that work.
• A short block of wall text (approx. 150 words) is a small descriptive panel or label that is usually
situated next to a work of art in a real exhibition. For the wall text, which will accompany each
object in the exhibition, you will write a few sentences that highlight a big idea about the work.
Think of this as your chance to grab the attention of a casual museum-goer who has not read
the catalogue and needs a “hook” to get interested in things. What can you say in this didactic
wall text to draw that viewer into the work and get him/her looking and thinking?
• Each of your 2 catalogue entries (approx. 500 words apiece) will talk about the work in more
detail. Start with a brief denotative description of the work. You might also think about what
aspects your reader should pay particular attention to. Your brief introductory description
should be followed by an explanation of the work’s significance. This is where you will do the
actual methodological analysis of your work. Explain how other scholars have approached the
work or how they have approached works similar to it. Think about how your approach casts a
new light on their interpretations.
◦ The catalogue entry should not repeat the description of the work in the curator’s essay (see
below).
◦ Include an image for each work of art at the beginning of the catalogue entry, along with a
catalogue number.
◦ List relevant technical info: art, title, date, location, medium of the work.
◦ Be sure to add your name at the bottom of each catalogue entry.
◦ Use endnote citations. You should refer to at least 2 different sources (not including
assigned readings from the course) in each entry.
• The sources mentioned in your citations should then be included in a bibliography at
the end of the whole catalogue.
As a Group (15% of your final grade):
Building on your reflections of the theme in part 1, you will now work as a team to bring
everything
together and form a coherent exhibition catalogue on a particular aspect of your theme.
• This is not a project that can be done at the last minute, and it is unfair to your group mates
if
you fall behind when they’re depending on your contributions to continue. Early in the process
you should discuss what roles each member will play in the group (editors, layout designers,
group coordinators), and discuss your schedules in a typical week and over the course of the
term. Using this information, set up mutually convenient meeting times as soon as you can, and
establish several deadlines for different stages of the project!
4
• Decide together on an exhibition title that narrows the scope of your theme, then design a title
page that includes the title and the names of all the members of the group. Make sure your title
works with everyone’s chosen objects.
• Building on your thematic reflections from part 1, work collaboratively to write a curators’ essay
that introduces your theme and explains the title.
o The essay should begin with an introduction to the exhibition that defines what the
theme of your exhibition is and what kinds of objects it includes (paintings, sculptures,
photography, buildings, performances, mixed media objects, etc.). You should also
explain why all these works in your exhibition have been brought together, and what
points you hope to make by having them seen as a group.
o Why is your exhibition important and how have others addressed this general theme?
You will need to do some additional research for this section, referring to at least 4
different sources all together (not including assigned readings for the course).
o To create the remainder of your curators’ essay, everyone will be contributing a short
discussion of their chosen works (at least 100 words for each work). Explain how each
work links to the theme and how it makes a unique contribution to the exhibition itself.
These discussions will thus introduce the kinds of questions that the work poses,
anticipating what method(s) will be used in the catalogue entries as an interpretive lens
through which the viewer/reader can better understand the work.
o You want to conclude your introduction by emphasizing what broad insights and ideas
you hope your viewer/reader will take away after seeing the works and reading the
catalogue.
o Use endnote citations for the essay.
• These sources will then be included in a bibliography at the end of the whole
catalogue.
• Include a bibliography for the whole catalogue, including citations from the curator’s essay and
all the catalogue entries.
• Create a floor plan of the exhibition. Pretend that you can bring anything you want to this
space, including buildings. Think carefully about how visitors will understand the theme based
on the order of the objects and on their movement through the space.
• Integrate all components of the exhibition into a consistent look and format. These components
should include the title page, curator’s essay, catalogue entries, wall labels, exhibition layout,
and bibliography of everyone’s sources.
Submission Details for Part 2
• Designate one member to upload a PDF of the whole catalogue to the Group Page on
Blackboard by 6pm on Tuesday April 4th. Here is a link to a short video tutorial on working in
groups through Blackboard:

405Nhi_-y5qNCjrK71
• Designate a single member of your group to upload a copy of your full catalogue to Turnitin by
6pm on Tuesday, April 4th.
• Bring a single printed copy of the whole catalogue to class on April 4th.
5
• Each member of the group should attach to the paper the Academic Integrity form, which must
be signed and filled out.
• Should you need advice about how to work effectively as a group, don’t hesitate to come and
speak to us. There will also be an option for you to provide a candid assessment of your group
and of your personal contributions. Instructions on how to do this will be made available closer
to the due date of the assignment.
Useful Links
Google docs is a great tool for collaborative writing – it will make sharing your thematic reflections and
working on your intro and conclusion much easier.
Doodle polls (doodle.com) are great for coordinating schedules.
The University of Toronto Writing Centre website (the tabs under the Advice section are particularly
useful for researching, writing, and citing):
http://www.writing.utoronto.ca/advice
The Purdue University OWL (Online Writing Lab) (particularly useful for researching, writing, and
citing):
https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/section/2/
The Chicago Manual of Style Quick Reference Guide
http://www.chicagomanualofstyle.org/tools_citationguide.html
How your Project will be Assessed
Grading in general will be based on how well you combine the works of art in your exhibition with the
theories and methodologies you choose to apply. Make connections between the works and the overall
exhibition idea, and between the various works themselves.
A = Creative and sophisticated evaluation of the relationships between works of art, of the
exhibition theme, and especially of the theoretical methods. Few if any typos. Careful editing;
thoughtful sentences. Meticulous care with the format of endnotes and the bibliography.
B = Analysis emphasizes either the works of art or the theoretical basis for your exhibition idea but
they are related to each; needs editing but generally ok writing. Some mistakes in the format of
bibliographies.
C = Describes the works of art in the exhibition and/or defines and explains the methodology
chosen, yet evidence of haste or lack of care in the details of the project. Explanations are general
or
are missing important pieces of information.
D = Confusing or lacking an analysis of the relationship between the works of art and/or the
theoretical methods. Writing either shows problems in grammar, organization, or logic, and as a
result, several ideas are unclear.